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A study, to appear in the Fall 2014 issue of the academic journal Perspectives on Politics, finds that the U.S. is no democracy, but instead an oligarchy, meaning profoundly corrupt, so that the answer to the study’s opening question, “Who governs? Who really rules?” in this country, is:
 
“Despite the seemingly strong empirical support in previous studies for theories of majoritarian democracy, our analyses suggest that majorities of the American public actually have little influence over the policies our government adopts. Americans do enjoy many features central to democratic governance, such as regular elections, freedom of speech and association, and a widespread (if still contested) franchise. But, …” and then they go on to say, it’s not true, and that, “America’s claims to being a democratic society are seriously threatened” by the findings in this, the first-ever comprehensive scientific study of the subject, which shows that there is instead “the nearly total failure of ‘median voter’ and other Majoritarian Electoral Democracy theories [of America]. When the preferences of economic elites and the stands of organized interest groups are controlled for, the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy.”
 
To put it short: The United States is no democracy, but actually an oligarchy.

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US Is an Oligarchy Not a Democracy, says Scientific Study | Common Dreams

If we had a truly independent and adversarial press in my country, this would be a big news story, but they still haven’t found that plane, so … whaddayagonnado right?

(via wilwheaton)

Umm…no shit, Sherlock. Only idiots who’ve never studied law and civics think the US is a democracy. It’s a representative republic. Also, oligarchy != tyranny. That’s just ignorant.

Our founding fathers were brilliant men, who realized one of the greatest problems with democracies is that you get the tyranny of both the majority, and the minority. The tyranny of the majority most people understand, but the tyranny of the minority is not something most people get. It’s simple: when you have a democracy, you always end up getting multiple political parties. These multiple parties end up all being elected to the legislative branch. In order to have any sort of law, if there isn’t a party that has >50% of the seats, they must make a coalition government in order to govern. This means that tiny, minority special interest parties get power well beyond what they ought to. Now, imagine if this was the US, and the GOP splits into the standard GOP and the tea party. What happens if the GOP gets 40% of the house, Dems get 35%, and tea party gets 25%. That means the GOP would form a coalition government with the tea party, and the tea party would, by and large, control the legislative agenda, even though they only have 25% of the seats. Hence, tyranny of the minority.

The other advantage of the 2-party, representative republic we have is that it is inherently conservative, which makes it, in the long-term, inherently more stable than a pure democracy. Just like the system of checks and balances most kids learn about, congress-judiciary-executive, the 2-party system acts as a checks and balances on itself. Change never happens too fast, as rapid changes are one of the major causes of discontent, and revolution. Sure, it pisses ppl off, but I’d rather have a government that I know will still be around, and not have to worry about revolution.

If we were not a representative republic, civil rights would have never happened, FDR’s social reforms would have been voted down in Congress, and we’d likely not have an African American president, because conservative white males were the vast majority of voters during that whole time.

thetrekkiehasthephonebox:

My favorite thing about when people point out that Khan was whitewashed in STID is when people say “But Ricardo Montalban was white!!11!!!1!!!” because

A) he most certainly was not considered a white man in 1960s America

and

B) that still would not excuse casting a white man as Khan Noonien Singh.

TRUTH!

TRUTH!

Salt Lake FanXperience is this week!
Check us out in booth #1000, near both the entrance and registration.

Salt Lake FanXperience is this week!

Check us out in booth #1000, near both the entrance and registration.

WHELP, THERE GOES MY FRIDAY! =(((((

WHELP, THERE GOES MY FRIDAY! =(((((

luciawestwick:

do you remember the scene where Steve shows page from his notebook with all the things he missed while he’d been napping? so, this page is different for Russia. here it is

image

moreover, I found another 7 versions.

US page

image

UK list

image

version for South Korea

image

page for France 

image

Italian version

image

Mexican one

image

list for Spain

image

quite interesting, isn’t it? let me know if there are other versions)

update! Australian list (via idkvader)

image

Update №2! page for Brazilia. (via doctorwhoses)

image

What I’m getting from this is that Thai food, Star Wars/Trek, Nirvana, and Rocky are universal constants?

moriarty:

fucknofetishization:

"Shit white guys say to Asian girls"

other stupid, creeper shit white men say to asian girls:

"hey, i’m the most powerful, financially able and respected race in the united states. of course your cute little ass wants to date me!"

"i can make your life so much more successful. i can give you anything you want in life. because i’m white."

"god, i LOVE asian culture. you know why asian women are just so treasurable? it’s the cute, docile way you guys behave. white girls and black girls are getting annoying because they speak their mind and have independent attitudes. i feel like i’m being tossed around. but no. you. asians. youre just dying to serve, arent you? its in your culture to be submissive. its sO HOT."

"why would you be with a wimpy, skinny asian guy with a chopstick dick when you CAN BE WITH ME, MIGHTY DONG."

"i can get you that citizenship, baby. i know you want it."

YOU GUYS ARE SO FUCKING DISGUSTING I WANT TO SHOVE MY CHOPSTICKS INTO YOUR PISSHOLE UNTIL IT GOES UP THE ENTIRE LENGTH OF YOUR DICK THEN ILL SNAP IT IN HALF

Other things white guys have said to me, literally:

"You’re a geisha girl, right?"

"Is your pussy yellow?"

"Will you be my geisha girl?"

"Aren’t you glad you’re here, and not in China?"

"I heard Asian women have thicker vaginas. Is that true?" (To this day, I still have no idea what that means.)

"You’re a slut. All Asians are sluts."

"You a dragon lady?"

"How much do you charge? Oh, you’re not a hooker? Then how did you get to here?"

I could go on, and on, and on.

Apr 9
did-you-kno:

Source 

This explains why everyone in my generation is scared of clown dolls. Fucking scary-ass things. I rip the stuffing out of any I see, just to make sure.

did-you-kno:

Source 

This explains why everyone in my generation is scared of clown dolls.

Fucking scary-ass things. I rip the stuffing out of any I see, just to make sure.

Apr 9

HAPPY REX MANNING DAY!

Apr 8
jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math



Something we in the first world take for granted. Amazing man.

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Something we in the first world take for granted. Amazing man.